Viderunt Omnes-Perotin

Viderunt Omnes” is a traditional Gregorian chant of the 11th century. The work is based on an ancient gradual of the same title, which was previously expanded upon by composers of the Notre Dame school. This organum, thought to be written for Christmas festivities, would have retained the same purpose as the original gradual – the cantus firmus, or tenor, “holds” the original chant, while the other parts develop complex melismas on the vowels.

Pérotin (fl. c. 1200), also called Perotin the Great, was a European composer, believed to be French, who lived around the end of the 12th and beginning of the 13th century. He was the most famous member of the Notre Dame school of polyphony and the ars antiqua style. He was one of very few composers of his day whose name has been preserved, and can be reliably attached to individual compositions; this is due to the testimony of an anonymous English student at Notre Dame known as Anonymous IV, who wrote about him and his predecessor Léonin. Anonymous IV called him “Magister Perotinus” (“Pérotin the Master”).

Latin

Viderunt omnes fines terræ
salutare Dei nostri.
Jubilate Deo, omnis terra.
Notum fecit Dominus salutare suum;
ante conspectum gentium
revelavit justitiam suam.

Modern English

All the ends of the earth have seen
the salvation of our God.
Rejoice in the Lord, all lands.
The Lord has made known his salvation;
in the sight of the heathen
he has revealed his righteousness.
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